Egypt: The Other Homeland for the Greeks


A poignant tale of Egypt’s once-thriving Greek community told by (Egyptian Greeks) who have returned after many decades to capture a (fainting) glimpse of their once old homes, neighborhoods, businesses and friends; and to bid farewell to their other homeland; Egypt.  

The 1956 class in EGC School, Alexandria. At that time most non-Egyptian EGC girls and their families had fled Egypt – however the Greek community, many of them in the photo, was the last to leave

I personally was moved by the Egyptian Greeks memories and their sincere feelings in the documentary. For me the film is not just about the once large Greek community in Egypt and especially in Alexandria, but it is a sort of a reminder, though somehow painful, of how tolerant and diverse the Egyptian society was during the 19- to the mid-20th century.

For an Alexandrian like myself, I long, like so many Egyptian Greeks, for those good old days when Alexandria was a real cosmopolitan city, where multi-ethnic communities co-existed in harmony and enriched the economy and culture of the ancient Mediterranean city. I believe that what Alexander the Great had in mind when he built his new city.


Read Dr. Ashraf Ezzat’s recent book

Egypt knew no Pharaohs cover art-15-1- resized

“Egypt Knew no Pharaohs nor Israelites”

Find out  how Egypt was never the land of the Israelites’ Exodus nor Palestine their Promised Land

Watch the book trailer on Youtube

… Available now on Amazon.


When the conqueror of the ancient world was unexpectedly approaching death, he made it clear to his generals that he was to be buried in the land of his beloved new city of Alexandria. It comes as no surprise to us Egyptians for we see Alexander the Great as the son of Amun.

With the final words of the Egyptian/Greeks in the documentary that revealed nostalgia dipped in tears, I couldn’t help but wonder if worldwide multiculturalism had finally come to an end.

4 thoughts on “Egypt: The Other Homeland for the Greeks

  1. In my early days in Egypt – ’70’s – there were still some Greek families and I enjoyed getting to know them. But choices to leave, and leave behind vast libraries and so forth was of course very painful.

    PS – I tried to ‘like’ your post but the ‘like’ button is not working…

    Like

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